Posts Tagged: html5

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HTML is an API

HTML is an API or rather it could be if we used more in the way it was intended. In a comment on this Hacker News post about Toapi, a library that makes clever use of XPath expressions in order to provide an API from existing web pages, a user wrote Now I don't want to be a downer: but we collectively seem to have forgotten that HTML as a markup language with sufficient semantic elements, is a perfect API in itself. ... Read more

Stefan Judis @ RuhrJS 2017: Watch your back, Browser! You’re being observed

At RuhrJS 2017 Stefan Judis gave an interesting talk on DOM APIs in the context of reactive programming and Observables: Read more

On Building Offline-Friendly Forms

Frontend developer Max Böck some time ago posted an article on how to create offline-friendly web forms Using the navigator.onLine method for checking if the user is still connected to the Internet, localStorage and service workers Max outlines a method for alleviating an annoying problem that comes with using forms on the web, particular on mobile platforms: Losing data and having to fill in a form repetitively if you lose your Internet connection before that form has been submitted. Having forms retain data in ... Read more

Creating Resuable Web Components with Stencil

Stencil is a compiler that generates Custom Elements (part of the Web Components specification) for reuse in any JavaScript web framework. Stencil was conceived by the creators of the Ionic Framework as means to build reliable framework-agnostic components. The Stencil developers put emphasis on creating progressive web apps that make use of modern browser features in a user-friendly manner. So, no matter if you use Angular, React or Vue.js for developing web applications Stencil allows you create and share reusable components that run ... Read more

Anjana Vakil @ RuhrJS 2017 – Immutable Data Structures for Functional JS

At RuhrJS 2017 Anjana Vakil gave a fascinating talk on immutable data structures for use with functional programming. This talk involves some great educational storytelling. Even if you've never had a computer science course on data structures and never entirely understood things like hashes, trees or tries, after having watched this talk you will! Read more

Paul Verbeek-Mas @ RuhrJS 2017 – Calendar / Kalender / تقويم (aka, the fun of locali[zs]ation)

At RuhrJS 2017 Paul Verbeek-Mas of NLHTML5 fame gave an interesting talk on the joys and intricacies of i18n and l10n with regard to how time, dates and calendars are rendered in web apps: Read more

Rachel Andrew @ RuhrJS 2017: Start Using CSS Grid Layout Today

As the obligatory CSS person at a JavaScript conference, at RuhrJS 2017 CSS expert Rachel Andrew gave a talk on CSS grid layouts and how they differ from flexbox layouts: Read more

Sara Harkousse @ RuhrJS 2017 – Web Components: It’s all rainbows and unicorns! Is it?

At RuhrJS 2017 Sara Harkousse gave a talk on web components and custom elements in particular. In this talk she gives a hands-on introduction on how to get started with custom elements: Read more

Remy Sharp @ Fronteers 2015: The Art of Debugging

At the Fronteers Conference in Amsterdam in October JavaScript specialist Remy Sharp talked about "The Art of Debugging" or rather his debugging workflow and useful best practices and approaches for debugging JavaScript and HTML5 apps. The talk contains lots of useful information on this complex subject. So, if you're developing JavaScript applications this presentation is very much worth watching: Remy Sharp - The Art of Debugging from Fronteers on Vimeo. Read more

Open-sourcing more of my stuff: Twoice, a ‘Twitter for voice messages’ prototype

Twoice is a prototype of a 'Twitter for voice messages' app built with Grails 1.3.6 (http://grails.org) and some HTML5 and Comet for the UI. It's a nice idea, which has been lingering on my hard disk far too long so I've now released it under the MIT license: https://github.com/BjoernKW/Twoice Read more
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