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Alice Boxhall: “Debugging Accessibility” at Fronteers Conference 2017

Alice Boxhall - “Debugging Accessibility” at Fronteers Conference 2017: Alice Boxhall: "Debugging Accessibility" at Fronteers Conference 2017 from Fronteers on Vimeo. Read more

Umar Hansa: “A Modern Front-end Workflow” at Fronteers Conference 2017

Umar Hansa - “A Modern Front-end Workflow” at Fronteers Conference 2017: Umar Hansa: "A Modern Front-end Workflow" at Fronteers Conference 2017 from Fronteers on Vimeo. Read more

On Building Offline-Friendly Forms

Frontend developer Max Böck some time ago posted an article on how to create offline-friendly web forms Using the navigator.onLine method for checking if the user is still connected to the Internet, localStorage and service workers Max outlines a method for alleviating an annoying problem that comes with using forms on the web, particular on mobile platforms: Losing data and having to fill in a form repetitively if you lose your Internet connection before that form has been submitted. Having forms retain data in ... Read more

Microservices and Decoupling Front-end Components

Microservices have become a common design pattern for splitting up and modularising monolithic applications. The indiscriminate application of this particular design pattern is quite a bit worrying, though. A few months ago I gave this answer to the question what the biggest struggle with Microservices is: Convincing people that microservices are not a cure-all but just another design pattern. You have to start out with a monolith and only if you realise along the way that some components might work better as a ... Read more

Using Swagger to Generate Client SDKs for REST APIs

These days Swagger is a popular, easy-to-use tool for (semi-)automatically documenting REST APIs on-the-fly. For example, in order to document a REST API created with Spring Boot and Jersey literally all you have to do is add these two entries to your Maven pom.xml: You'll then get a ready-made documentation for all your REST API endpoints. An example of how this looks like can be seen here. While this already is very useful in that it helps with properly documenting your software, especially ... Read more

JHipster: A Spring / AngularJS App Generator

You're a boring, hoary Java developer but secretly always wanted to belong to that hip JavaScript-Single-Page-Application crowd? Well, with JHipster now you can! On a more serious note, JHipster is a Yeoman generator that lets you bootstrap integrated Java (for the back-end server stuff) / AngularJS (for everything front-end and UI) web apps. JHipster makes use of proven technologies such as: Grunt Bower AngularJS Maven Spring Boot Spring Web MVC The project's goal is to provide the means for easily creating a beautiful state-of-the-art HTML5 / CSS3 / JavaScript ... Read more

Superhero.js

Creating, testing and maintaining a large JavaScript code base is not easy — especially since great resources on how to do this are hard to find. This page is a collection of the best articles, videos and presentations we've found on the topic. Superhero.js is a useful and comprehensive list of articles about developing, testing and maintaining JavaScript applications. It deals with fundamentals of the JavaScript language, best practices and broaches subjects such as testing, tools and security. No matter if you're JavaScript ... Read more

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