Archive for April, 2018

Home » April 2018

Stefan Judis @ RuhrJS 2017: Watch your back, Browser! You’re being observed

At RuhrJS 2017 Stefan Judis gave an interesting talk on DOM APIs in the context of reactive programming and Observables: Read more

Alexandra Leisse @ RuhrJS 2017 – Death by a thousand paper cuts

At RuhrJS 2017 UX designer Alexandra Leisse talked about her personal experience with designing user experience for enterprise applications and how to deal with the continually growing complexity involved in that process: Read more

Kim Crayton @ RuhrJS 2017 – What is Community Engineering?

At RuhrJS 2017 Kim Crayton gave this energetic and hopeful as well as insightful talk on community engineering in terms of diversity and how diversity benefits both communities and companies from an economic point of view: Read more

Alicia Sedlock: “The Landscape of Front-End Testing” at Fronteers Conference 2017

Alicia Sedlock - “The Landscape of Front-End Testing” at Fronteers Conference 2017: Alicia Sedlock: "The Landscape of Front-End Testing" at Fronteers Conference 2017 from Fronteers on Vimeo. Read more

Ashley Bischoff: “1Up Your Writing with Plain Language” at Fronteers Conference 2017

Ashley Bischoff - “1Up Your Writing with Plain Language” at Fronteers Conference 2017: Ashley Bischoff: "1Up Your Writing with Plain Language" at Fronteers Conference 2017 from Fronteers on Vimeo. Read more

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