Archive for November, 2017

Home » November 2017

12 Factors for Building Quality Web Applications

When considering the different aspects that potentially contribute to (or detract from, mark you ...) quality, reliability and maintainability of a web application I always like to come back to the Twelve-Factor App. Originally created by Adam Wiggins in 2011 the Twelve-Factor App is a highly useful design framework for both creating new web apps and measuring and improving the quality of existing applications. This framework allows you to create and maintain long-term viable applications that make use of declarative formats, clearly ... Read more

Microservices and Decoupling Front-end Components

Microservices have become a common design pattern for splitting up and modularising monolithic applications. The indiscriminate application of this particular design pattern is quite a bit worrying, though. A few months ago I gave this answer to the question what the biggest struggle with Microservices is: Convincing people that microservices are not a cure-all but just another design pattern. You have to start out with a monolith and only if you realise along the way that some components might work better as a ... Read more

Web Apps and Websites: Documents and Applications

Today when starting development of a new website using a pattern that just a few years ago used to be called single-page application (SPA) not only seems to be the new default but even like the only way of creating stuff for the web. Clearly though not all content for the web is created equal: On one side of the spectrum we have (mostly) static documents identified by URIs and returned by URLs. Most websites that simply provide content (news sites for ... Read more

William Hertling on AI Risks

William Hertling, author of the Singularity Series books and the recent techno-crime thriller Kill Process earlier this year shared a few of his thoughts regarding artificial (general) intelligence (AI / AGI) and the hazards as well as ethical ramifications and quandaries that the emergence of AI / AGI might give rise to. In Ten Musings on AI Risks William broaches both pragmatic subjects such as risk mitigation and deeper moral questions. In his (and my ...) opinion rather than artificially slowing down ... Read more

Privacy Preference Center

Strictly necessary

These cookies are necessary for the site to function.

PHPSESSID: Preserves user session state across page requests.

PHPSESSID

Statistics

Google Analytics statistics cookies help us to understand how visitors interact with our websites by collecting and reporting information anonymously.

You can opt out of Google Analytics tracking by clicking on the opt-out link in the banner below.

_ga: Registers a unique ID that is used to generate statistical data on how the visitor uses the website.

_gat: Used by Google Analytics to throttle request rate.

_gid: Registers a unique ID that is used to generate statistical data on how the visitor uses the website.

ga-disable-UA-25326096-9: Stores whether you have opted out of Google Analytics tracking.

_ga,_gat,_gid,ga-disable-UA-25326096-9

Privacy

These cookies are used for storing your privacy settings

gdpr%5Bprivacy_bar%5D: Privacy settings have been reviewed.

gdpr[consent_types]: The uses of your data you agreed to.

gdpr[allowed_cookies]: The cookies you allowed us to set.

gaoop_hide_info: Set if you agreed to our use of Google Analytics.

gdprprivacy_bar,gdpr[consent_types],gdpr[allowed_cookies],gaoop_hide_info

Security

We use Wordfence to secure our website against hacking attempts: https://www.wordfence.com/

Cookies set by the Wordfence plugin
To help you understand which cookies the Wordfence plugin sets, when installed on your WordPress site, we have provided the guide below. Wordfence currently sets three cookies and we explain what each cookie does, who will have the cookie set, and why the cookie helps secure your site.

wfwaf-authcookie-(hash)
What it does: This cookie is used by the Wordfence firewall to perform a capability check of the current user before WordPress has been loaded.

Who gets this cookie: This is only set for users that are able to log into WordPress.

How this cookie helps: This cookie allows the Wordfence firewall to detect logged in users and allow them increased access. It also allows Wordfence to detect non-logged in users and restrict their access to secure areas. The cookie also lets the firewall know what level of access a visitor has to help the firewall make smart decisions about who to allow and who to block.

wf_loginalerted_(hash)
What it does: This cookie is used to notify the Wordfence admin when an administrator logs in from a new device or location.

Who gets this cookie: This is only set for administrators.

How this cookie helps: This cookie helps site owners know whether there has been an admin login from a new device or location.

wfCBLBypass
What it does: Wordfence offers a feature for a site visitor to bypass country blocking by accessing a hidden URL. This cookie helps track who should be allowed to bypass country blocking.

Who gets this cookie: When a hidden URL defined by the site admin is visited, this cookie is set to verify the user can access the site from a country restricted through country blocking. This will be set for anyone who knows the URL that allows bypass of standard country blocking. This cookie is not set for anyone who does not know the hidden URL to bypass country blocking.

How this cookie helps: This cookie gives site owners a way to allow certain users from blocked countries, even though their country has been blocked.

wfvt_#,wordfence_verifiedHuman,wfwaf-authcookie-(hash),wf_loginalerted_(hash),wfCBLBypass

Close your account?

Your account will be closed and all data will be permanently deleted and cannot be recovered. Are you sure?