Archive for February, 2017

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Design & Quantum Superposition

Last year, Hungarian designer Csongor Bartus published a thought-provoking article I've only recently come across. Quantum mechanics and design are two words you don't often see juxtaposed and probably rightfully so. No, I've not gone crazy and I'm not going to go down some weird esoteric "Quantum Design" rabbit hole here. However, Csongor borrows the term superposition from quantum mechanics as a metaphor for an interesting new angle on design for the web: To cut in, let's equip all content with all states ... Read more

Documentation and Spreadsheets with an API: GitBook and Fieldbook

Continuing on last week's post about RunKit - a Node.js prototyping environment for the browser - here are two interesting tools that make use of RunKit: GitBook is a collaborative documentation tool that allows you to create beautiful, version-controlled documentation for your software. It's used by software components like Redux and it leverages RunKit to embed live, reactive code examples in your documentation. Fieldbook is a database creation tool thats touted as "A database with an API – as simple as a spreadsheet". ... Read more

RunKit: Instant, reproducible JavaScript playgrounds

I'm a huge proponent of the idea that programming tools should directly interact with coding and provide immediate, responsive feedback to changes. RunKit is such a tool that offers a comprehensive JavaScript / Node.js prototyping environment. The service supplies you with instant, sandboxed Node.js instances called "notebooks" that allow you to experiment with the whole gamut of NPM modules. Moreover, "from graphs and maps to low level hexadecimal inspectors" RunKit offers data visualisations for immediate visual feedback. Once done you can showcase your ... Read more

Deploying Spring Boot applications as old-fashioned WAR files

Spring Boot is an opinionated convention-over-configuration framework for creating stand-alone Spring-based Java applications. Its objective is to provide you with a preselected best practice choice of libraries (both from the Spring platform and by third parties) for a given task, e.g. building a web application that connects to a database and provides REST resources creating a scheduled batch task that exports and aggregates data from various data sources providing an API that connects to SOAP Web Services It both helps you with getting started quickly and ... Read more

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