Archive for April, 2014

Home » April 2014

ZenQuery: From Idea To Product In 2 Weeks

Earlier this week I've launched a new product called ZenQuery. In a nutshell, ZenQuery is an application that creates an instant REST API (with JSON, XML and CSV formats) for SQL queries. This allows you to easily access any kind of data from your database without having to deal with technical details such as database drivers, connections, ORM or caching. A typical use case is an enterprise company which for example wants to create a new mobile application. The data needed for such ... Read more

Superhero.js

Creating, testing and maintaining a large JavaScript code base is not easy — especially since great resources on how to do this are hard to find. This page is a collection of the best articles, videos and presentations we've found on the topic. Superhero.js is a useful and comprehensive list of articles about developing, testing and maintaining JavaScript applications. It deals with fundamentals of the JavaScript language, best practices and broaches subjects such as testing, tools and security. No matter if you're JavaScript ... Read more

OpenSSL Heartbleed Bug: Idea For New Password Management Protocol

On 07 April 2014 a very serious OpenSSL bug with the colourful name 'Heartbleed' was disclosed. You can read more about this bug here, here and on the blog of the Chuck Norris of cryptography, Bruce Schneier. You can check here if your website or a service you're using is affected by this bug. Suffice it to say that the consequences are as severe as can be for most of the core services of the Internet. GitHub, Google, Facebook, Dropbox, Evernote, Tumblr, ... Read more

Surrounded By Idiots?

This week a video called 'The Expert' (based the short story "The Meeting" by Alexey Berezin) was spread by a CNET article aptly titled 'This is how an engineer feels when he's surrounded by idiots': [youtube BKorP55Aqvg] I think most engineers can relate to this situation. However, the real question remains: Why do engineers time and time again find themselves in such Dilbertesque situations. Is it really because we're surrounded by idiots, nitwits and PHBs? Perhaps, but this is only a small part of ... Read more

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