Archive for June, 2013

Home » June 2013

i18n is a hard and largely unsolved problem

After last week's post about the intricacies of dealing with date and time representations in software I promised to write about another seemingly simple yet surprisingly complex area of software development: Internationalization. Some time ago a I wrote about an interesting presentation on i18n and localization in Rails by Heather Rivers of Yammer. If you're in any way dealing with internationalization (i18n) and localization (L10n) of software (which you basically should if you're into software development) have a look at the video of ... Read more

The time! The time! Who’s got the time?

I'm currently working on an app that allows you to set and display dates and times in various ways. Hence, lately I've been working quite a bit with calendars, dates, times, date localization and all the funny intricacies that come with them. To name but a few of those: In some countries the week customarily starts with Sunday, while in others it starts with Monday. Some programming languages and date APIs use 0 as the index for the first day of the week, some ... Read more

Being the build guy

Being the build guy, i.e being the one who is responsible for a smooth build and deployment process on a software project is a role that's usually disliked by developers: It means a lot of system administration rather than coding. If something breaks and development grinds to a halt the burden of getting the project on the road again usually is on the person who manages the continuous integration server. However, I think being the build guy on a project actually is ... Read more

The Tinfoil Hats Were Right All Along

There sure is a lot to rant and be angry about concerning this week's revelations about PRISM and how the US government has been issuing blanket orders to tech companies such as Google, Facebook and Apple requiring them to hand over personal data, effectively allowing agencies like the NSA to spy on all of us. These events mark a turning point for the way of how citizens are treated by their government and the legal system. While until now the presumption of ... Read more

(Deutsch) Eine sinnvolle Alternative zu QR Codes

Sorry, this entry is only available in German. Read more

Privacy Preference Center

Strictly necessary

These cookies are necessary for the site to function.

PHPSESSID: Preserves user session state across page requests.

PHPSESSID

Statistics

Google Analytics statistics cookies help us to understand how visitors interact with our websites by collecting and reporting information anonymously.

You can opt out of Google Analytics tracking by clicking on the opt-out link in the banner below.

_ga: Registers a unique ID that is used to generate statistical data on how the visitor uses the website.

_gat: Used by Google Analytics to throttle request rate.

_gid: Registers a unique ID that is used to generate statistical data on how the visitor uses the website.

ga-disable-UA-25326096-9: Stores whether you have opted out of Google Analytics tracking.

_ga,_gat,_gid,ga-disable-UA-25326096-9

Privacy

These cookies are used for storing your privacy settings

gdpr%5Bprivacy_bar%5D: Privacy settings have been reviewed.

gdpr[consent_types]: The uses of your data you agreed to.

gdpr[allowed_cookies]: The cookies you allowed us to set.

gaoop_hide_info: Set if you agreed to our use of Google Analytics.

gdprprivacy_bar,gdpr[consent_types],gdpr[allowed_cookies],gaoop_hide_info

Security

We use Wordfence to secure our website against hacking attempts: https://www.wordfence.com/

Cookies set by the Wordfence plugin
To help you understand which cookies the Wordfence plugin sets, when installed on your WordPress site, we have provided the guide below. Wordfence currently sets three cookies and we explain what each cookie does, who will have the cookie set, and why the cookie helps secure your site.

wfwaf-authcookie-(hash)
What it does: This cookie is used by the Wordfence firewall to perform a capability check of the current user before WordPress has been loaded.

Who gets this cookie: This is only set for users that are able to log into WordPress.

How this cookie helps: This cookie allows the Wordfence firewall to detect logged in users and allow them increased access. It also allows Wordfence to detect non-logged in users and restrict their access to secure areas. The cookie also lets the firewall know what level of access a visitor has to help the firewall make smart decisions about who to allow and who to block.

wf_loginalerted_(hash)
What it does: This cookie is used to notify the Wordfence admin when an administrator logs in from a new device or location.

Who gets this cookie: This is only set for administrators.

How this cookie helps: This cookie helps site owners know whether there has been an admin login from a new device or location.

wfCBLBypass
What it does: Wordfence offers a feature for a site visitor to bypass country blocking by accessing a hidden URL. This cookie helps track who should be allowed to bypass country blocking.

Who gets this cookie: When a hidden URL defined by the site admin is visited, this cookie is set to verify the user can access the site from a country restricted through country blocking. This will be set for anyone who knows the URL that allows bypass of standard country blocking. This cookie is not set for anyone who does not know the hidden URL to bypass country blocking.

How this cookie helps: This cookie gives site owners a way to allow certain users from blocked countries, even though their country has been blocked.

wfvt_#,wordfence_verifiedHuman,wfwaf-authcookie-(hash),wf_loginalerted_(hash),wfCBLBypass

Close your account?

Your account will be closed and all data will be permanently deleted and cannot be recovered. Are you sure?