Archive for February, 2013

Home » February 2013

DHH on “No more remote work at Yahoo”

David Heinemeier-Hansson of 37signals on how Yahoo is completely mistaken to do away with remote work. Read more

Continous Integration with Circle Or: Coming Full Circle

I've recently tried out Circle, a hosted continuous integration service, and I'm quite thrilled about it. Registration / login works via GitHub. Once logged in, Circle lets you choose a GitHub repository and starts the first build right away. Circle claims that setup is as easy as: Sign up to Circle, Give Circle permission to access GitHub on your behalf, Click on a project repository From my experience so far this claim is absolutely correct. Configuration is completely automatic. I've only tried it with Rails so ... Read more

Designing For Retina Displays

Under http://coding.smashingmagazine.com/2012/08/20/towards-retina-web/ there's a nice article about what to consider in terms of high-resolution / Retina displays when designing your next website and how to address common issues with how websites are rendered on Retina displays. Read more

The World Runs On Excel

There's been a lot of talk lately about the importance of Excel and that Excel is everywhere. I'd even go as far as saying that most of the world in one way or another runs on Excel. Excel in my opinion is the best piece of software Microsoft has made so far (other people seem to agree with me, by the way). While Microsoft didn't invent the spreadsheet - that credit goes to VisiCalc and IBM with Lotus 1-2-3 - they were ... Read more

Presentation on i18n and Crowdsourcing Localization in Rails

Linguistic Potluck: Crowdsourcing Localization in Rails by Heather Rivers of Yammer is a great presentation on the intricacies of web app internationalization, its linguistic implications and some awesome solutions to the most common i18n-related issues. Read more

Backgrid.js – Tool Set For Creating Data Grids With Backbone.js

Backgrid.js is a toolset for creating data grids with Backbone.js. It simplifies creation and population of data grids as well as common data grid operations like sorting and pagination. Read more

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